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20120928
20121006
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 190 (some duplicates have been removed)
governance survey and are the basis for our discussion for the first 45 minutes of this edition of the "washington journal." good morning. today is saturday, september 29. we want to find out from you about divided government. are you in favor of it? would you prefer to see one party, two parties, three parties? one party versus divided government, your preferences is our topic for the first segment of the program. 202-585-3880 is our number for democrats. republicans can call us at 202-585-3881. independents, 202-585-3882. if you're calling outside the u.s., 202-585-3883. we'll show you those numbers throughout the segment. if you want to get in touch with us via social media, the address, twitter, twithtwith cspanwj. on facebook, it's facebook.com/cspan. if you want to send us an email, that address is journal @organize org. -- is journal @c-span.org. this is the gallup poll we're talking about. it's the gallup annual governance survey. they write while americans tend to lean toward one-party government over divided government in presidential election years, this year finds th
in advance, will be three on the economy and one each on health care, the role of government and governing, with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics and choices. both candidates will also have two-minute closing statements. the audience here in the hall is promised to remain silent. no cheers, applause, boos, hisses, among other noisy, distracting things, so we may all concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception right now, though, as we welcome president obama... and governor romney. [cheers and applause] >> reporter: gentlemen, welcome to you both. let's start with the economy. segment one. and let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs. each of you have two minutes to start. a coin toss has determined, mr. president, gufirst. >> thank you very much, jim, for this opportunity. i want to thank governor romney and the university of denver for your hospitality. there are a lot of points i want to make tonight, but the most important one is that 20 years ago, i became t
's policies of trickle-down government. >> i am concerned the path we're on has been unsuccessful. the president has a view to one similar when he ran four years ago, that a bigger government spending more, taxing more, regulating more -- a trickle- down government -- would work. that is not the right answer for america. >> president obama was more subdued in his comments, failing to make one mention of romney's infamous 47%, and his background of bain capital. addressing romney's tax plan, obama said romney's effort to cut taxes for the wealthy would be to the gutting of essential government programs. box for 18 months he has been running on this tax plan. five weeks before the election, now he is saying his big, bold idea is, "never mind." the fact is, if you are lowering the rates the way you described, governor, then it is not possible to come up with enough deductions and loopholes that only affect high-income individuals to avoid either raising the deficit or burdening the middle class. it is math. >> mitt romney challenged obama's assertion that his tax plan would cost the
on domessic policy, including health care, the role of governments, and the number one issue on voters' minds, the economy. you can expect both candidates to have a say on the 8.1% of the unemployment rate and the national debt. keep in mind with early voting under way in 10 states already, many americans have already cast their ballots. still governor romney and presideet obama have plenty of opportunity to hurt or help their campaign in the next nine minutes. no cheering, no. now, the moderator, jim lehrer of pbs. >> good evening from maaness arena at the university of denver in denver colorado. i am jim lehrer of pbs news hour, and i welcome the new to the first of the 2012 presidential debates between president obama, the democratic nominee, and former massachusetts governor, mitt romney, the republican nominee. this debate and the next three, two presidential, one ice- presidential, are sponsored by the commission of presidential debates. tonight's nine minutes will be about he domestic feature and will follow a format designed by the commission. there will be six roughly 15 minute seg
each on health care, the role of government and the governing with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both candidates also have to- minute closing statements. there is a noise exception right now as we welcome president obama and governor romney. [applause] revi >> welcome to you both. let's start with the economy, a segment one. let's start with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs? you have two minutes to start. mr. president, you will go first. >> i want to thank the university of denver for your hospitality. 20 years ago, i became the luckiest man on earth because michelle obama agreed to marry me. so i just want to wish, sweetie, you have the anniversary and let you know that a year from now we will not be celebrating it in front of 40 million people. [laughter] four years ago, we went through the worst financial crisis since the great depression. millions of jobs were lost. the auto industry was on the brink of collapse. the financial system had frozen up. because of the
will be free on the economy and one each on health care, the role of garment, and governing. there will be an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both will have two-minute closing statements. the audience has promised to remain silent. no cheers, applause, or other noisy distracting things so we may concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception right now as we welcome president obama and governor romney. [applause] welcome to you both. let's start with the economy. segment one. let's begin with drops. what are -- let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs? you have two minutes each to start. the coin toss has determined that mr. president goes first. >> thank you very much for this opportunity. thank you, governor romney, and the university of denver. 20 years ago i became the luckiest man on earth because michelle obama agreed to marry me. i want to wish you happy anniversary and let you know that a year from now we will not be celebrating it
captioning sponsored by cbs >> i don't think government can solve all our problems but government's not the source of our problems, either. >> i have a plan. i have five steps that will get this economy going. >> i'm not fighting to create democratic jobs or republican jobs, i'm trying to create american jobs. >> i will not raise taxes on middle-income americans. >> the debates will matter to some undecided voters. >> the debates could decide the election for either one of us. >> from denver, colorado, here is scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. we're about to see the one thing we haven't seen in this long campaign for the presidency-- the candidates side by side. it's the first of three debates between the democratic incumbent-- 51-year-old barack obama-- and his republican challenger 65-year-old mitt romney. it comes 34 days before the election-- though early voting is already under way in many states. the focus tonight is domestic issues, including the economy, still struggling to recover from the great recession. polls show the race is very close nationally, but in swing st
. one is make the big picture. he's the free enterpriser and president obama is the big government planner. and those are big differences in philosophy in government. two, romney has a tax cut plan. he has a spending cut plan. he has an energy plan. he's got to make it clear. he's got to explain to people the connection between his plans and the economic recovery that we have not yet had. that's a tall order for romney. and he's going to have to fight hard for it while the, of course is attacking him. >> you said earlier i was watching kudlow and company, you said the first impression is important. he's got to swing right away. you think he'll do that? >> that's my hunch. i've seen this before. aggressive. he's got to put this sort of line in the sand. here's what i believe. and here's what he believes. and there's a big choice in this election. he is the guy who wants redistribution. i'm the guy who wants growth. he's the guy who wants government centered economy. i'm the guy for free enterprise. he's got to say that. but it's doubly hard because he's got to put meat on the bones
a woman and her children. tonight, turkey announced it had already fired back. the turkish government is deeply hostile to president assad and says that syria must be held to account. they are urging nato allies to help. >> the a very very dangerous situation. all responsible nations need to band together to persuade the assad regime to have a cease- fire. >> this is exactly what many people feared, the conflict spreading and flaming an already divided region. turkey backed the rebels, lightly armed, but without clear that ship. they have taken ground from a substantial army backed by iran in particular. president assad no longer controls his country, but equally he has not lost it. the longer the syrian deadlock, the greater the risk to its neighbors and the region will get sucked into confrontation. >> you will see this proxy conflict boiling over. you need some kind of international momentum to form a consensus that action can shift the ground away from conflict. >> note and to the conflict is in sight. syrian state television is that this does result of unbearable bombings and a l
's happened in our government in recent years and has continued up until now is a breakdown in the trust among our people and the -- >> don't adjust your set. this is what it was like live. hold on for just a second. this is what it was like for people watching the debate that night. [ silence ] >> the pool broadcaster from philadelphia have temporarily lost the audio. it is not a conspiracy against governor carter or president ford. they will fix it as soon as possible. >> the pool audio from philadelphia has been lost momentarily. we hope to have it back any minute. we don't know what's happened to it. >> it took 27 minutes to get that sound back. so the first time we had incumbent president face his challenger on tv in a debate in american history, it was totally novel to the country, it had never happened before, and the verdict to the extent that there was any clear winner or not, nobody really seemed to think there was a clear winner. frankly, it was almost beside the point. everybody was distracted with what went wrong, technically, 27 minutes of silence all blamed on this tiny little c
is trickle-down government and i don't think that's what america believes in. i see instead a prosperity that comes through freedom. >> reporter: romney's reception at the event was reinforced by instant polling that he won last night's encounter by more than 2-1. but at an obama rally in denver, the president charged romney had repeatedly misrepresented his own positions on jobs and taxes. >> so you see the man on stage last night, he does not want to be held accountable for the real mitt romney's decisions and what he's been saying for the last year. and that's because he knows full well that we don't want what he's been selling for last year. (cheers and applause) governor romney may dance around his positions but if you want to be president, you yes to american people the truth. >> woodruff: the president's campaign hit that note again and again, insisting romney had not changed the dynamics of the race, even as they argued he had played fast and loose with the truth. david axelrod spoke on msnbc. >> the problem isn't with his debate performance the problem is with his underlying the
to be put in to a situation where you have a government determining somebody who wants to put the idea up on television can't do that. that's one of the things with the campaign finance is that it's what to nay say about democracy is the worst form of government except for the worst form of government. the campaign finance system may not look perfect. when you look at the alternative i don't know they are god either. i don't know if it's a good to have the department of justice to determine he can't run television ads. ic you should be able to do that. i think it's a first amendment right. when you move to the constitutional right it starts getting ugly. >> yeah. we don't -- even or side there's been money in elections for forever. lots of money. going back as long as with can. we can go back to george washington and the night before. there was tails of flying rum and beer and the voice rang out the day 6 election day. how to they got out of the book. there's been money and things in politics for as long as we know. i don't think either side of a necessarily thinks the money itself and ha
the variety of these studies, jared might not like them. the question is how would the government do it? i don't know the answer to that to be honest and that's a fair point. >> brown: that he hasn't been specific enough about which deductions? >> we know jared can write a plan that raises taxes on the middle-class. we know i can write a plan that it doesn't. and the question is what plan will we get? >> it's unquestionably the case as lots of independent analysts have found this that if you're going to fill that hole you can't do it just by canceling those deductions and closing the loopholes on the upper income folks. you have to move down below, say 200. you have to get to 100,000, maybe lower than that. at that point you're hid people that we view as middle-class. i believe the governor should specify i'm going to close the mortgage interest deduction. i'm going to get rid of the health care deduction if that's part of his plan. to leave that out strikes me as really quite confusing and misleading. >> brown: the president hasn't been specific about many of these things, too >> and he shoul
wants to have government investing for us. he wants to hire more government workers. he wants to raise taxes, as the vice-president biden blurted out today, they want to raise taxes by a trillion dollars, or more like $2 trillion by our calculation. he has laid out the same policies he has been following the last four years. i don't think that sells very well when people hear that. he also didn't have the chance to continue to misrepresent my views. i got the chance to present my own perspectives. and i think that helped me. >> sean: do you think to some extent that the obama campaign has overreached by calling you a tax cheat and attacking bain capital and even suggesting that you were responsible for the death of this man's wife, et cetera, et cetera, they spent millions and millions of dollars advancing a narrative against you, you know, the president himself saying that your plan is for dirty air and dirty water and you want kids with autism and the elderly to fend for themselves. to some extent do you think that by over reaching and when people saw you side by side that that partl
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 190 (some duplicates have been removed)